Safeguarding Policy 2021

Model Policy for Primary, Secondary, Special Schools and PRU’s. This policy sets out the approach and provision for safeguarding learners in Flintshire.

Date first implemented September 2017
Date of last amendment September 2019
Version 3
Date of next review 2023
Policy owner for review Learning Advisor – Health, Wellbeing & Safeguarding
School Golftyn CP School
Date policy approved This policy was approved by the School’s Governing Body on: October 2021
Review frequency This policy will be reviewed annually by the head teacher, staff and governors, or if any amendments occur in legislation or in consideration of changes in working practices which may stem from incidents or allegations.
Review date October 2022
Chair of Governors Declaration Neil Cottrell
Safeguarding Governor Declaration Gill Harrison
Head teacher Declaration Nicola Cooper

 

Accessible Formats

This document is available in English and Welsh in Microsoft Word and pdf formats in Arial font size 12 as standard. Other accessible formats including large print, Braille, BSL DVD, easy-read, audio and electronic formats, and other languages can be made available upon request. To request a copy of this document in an accessible format contact the school office.

School Safeguarding Contact Details Name Contact

 

Designated Safeguarding Person (DSP)

 

Nicola Cooper 01244 830569
Deputy Designated Safeguarding Person

 

Claire Thompson 01244 830569
Deputy Designated Safeguarding Person

 

Sharon Kevan 01244 830569
Head teacher

 

Nicola Cooper 01244 830569
Designated Governor for Safeguarding

 

Gill Harrison 01244 830569
Chair of Governors

 

Neil Cottrell 01244 830569

 

Flintshire Key Contact Details

To make a Child Protection Referral

 

Office hours: 01352 701000 

Out of Hours phone number: 0845 0533116

Generic Contact Centre number for Children’s Safeguarding General Enquiries 01352 702601
Adult Social Services – Single Point of Access 03000 858858
Looked After Children     

 

01352 701092
Safeguarding Unit Manager

 

01352 702600
Children’s Safeguarding Managers                                01352 704966 / 701049
Chief Officer, Education & Youth          01352 704601
Designated Safeguarding Lead for Education (Senior Manager, School Improvement) 01352 704019 / 07775 706342
Learning Advisor  – Health, Well-being and Safeguarding  01352 704054 / 07867 684 653
Senior Learning Advisor – Engagement                          01352 704066 / 07785695823
Senior Education Social Worker                                      01352 704137 / 07876 790250
Senior Manager for Flintshire Youth Justice Service and Sorted          01352 702695 / 07909 002014

 

 

North Wales Police                                                          

 

Emergency: 999

Non-Emergency: 101

 

Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………4

The Framework for Safeguarding in Wales……………………………………………………..6

Prevention…………………………………………………………………………………………………9

Roles and Responsibilities…………………………………………………………………………9

Procedures…………………………………………………………………………………………..16

Information Sharing……………………………………………………………………………………20

Supporting those at Risk………………………………………………………………………….22

Safeguarding Responsibilities in Specific Circumstances…………………………………24

Domestic Abuse, Gender-based violence, Sexual violence and Harmful cultural practices………………………………………………………………………………………………26

Online Safety…………………………………………………………………………………………28

Community Cohesion – Preventing Radicalisation………………………………….. ………32

School Site Security……………………………………………………………………………..…33

Safer Recruitment Practice…………………………………………………………………….…36

Allegation against a member of staff or adult……………………………..………………….38

Equality and Diversity………………………………..……………………………………………39

North Wales Safeguarding Children’s Board………………………………………………….40

References……………………………………………………………………………………………41

Appendix…………………………………………………………………………………………………43

 

 

 

 

 

  • Golftyn CP School recognises the moral and statutory responsibility to safeguard and promote the wellbeing of all children. We recognise the importance of providing an ethos and environment within our school that will help learners to feel safe, secure and respected; encourage them to talk openly; and enable them to feel confident that they will be listened to. We are alert to the signs of abuse and neglect and follow the Wales Safeguarding Procedures 2019 https://www.safeguarding.wales/ to ensure that learners receive effective support, protection and justice.

Our school core safeguarding principles are:

  • All learners have a right to be protected from all forms of abuse and discrimination and to be treated equally regardless of age, gender, racial origin, culture, religious belief, language, disability or sexual identity.
  • All learners have a right to be heard and to have their wishes and feelings taken into account.
  • All staff understand safe professional practice and adhere to our code of conduct and other associated policies.
  • All staff have a responsibility to recognise vulnerability in learners and act on any concern in accordance with this policy.

There are three main elements to this policy:

  • Prevention through the culture, teaching and pastoral support offered to learners;
  • Procedures for identifying and reporting cases, or suspected cases, of abuse. Because of our day-to-day contact with children, school staff are well placed to observe the outward signs of abuse;
  • Support to those learners who may have been abused.

This policy applies to all staff and volunteers working in Golftyn CP School and its governors.  Learning support assistants, mid-day supervisors, caretakers, secretaries as well as teachers can be the first point of disclosure for a child. This first point of contact is an important part of the child protection process and it is essential that all staff are aware of and implement the school procedures.

1.2 Key definitions relevant to Safeguarding Children

Safeguarding is defined by Keeping Learners Safe Guidance 2020 https://gov.wales/keeping-learners-safe as ‘preventing and protecting children from abuse, neglect or other kinds of harm, and educating those around them to recognise the signs and dangers’.

Safeguarding and promoting the well-being of all children attending an education

Setting is defined as:

  • protecting children from risk of abuse, neglect or other kinds of harm
  • preventing impairment of children’s health or development
  • ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of
  • safe and effective care
  • taking action to enable all children to achieve the best outcomes.

All staff should be aware of the definitions of abuse and neglect in the Social Services and Well-being Act (Wales) 2014 as well as the signs and indicators of abuse and neglect. This is essential in order to communicate concerns about harm in a meaningful way. The definitions below are identified in the Wales Safeguarding Procedures 2019:

Abuse’ means physical, sexual, psychological, emotional or financial abuse

Neglect’ means a failure to meet a person’s basic physical, emotional, social or psychological needs, which is likely to result in an impairment of the person’s well-being (for example, an impairment of the person’s health or, in the case of a child, an impairment of the child’s development);

‘A child’ The Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014 and accompanying Guidance define a ‘child’ as a person who is aged under 18.

‘A child at risk’ S.130 (4) of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014 defines a child at risk as a child who:

  • Is experiencing or is at risk of abuse, neglect or other kinds of harm;
  • Has needs for care and support (whether or not the authority is meeting any of those needs).

An ‘adult at risk’ is an adult who:

  • is experiencing or is at risk of abuse or neglect;
  • has needs for care and support (whether or not the authority is meeting any of those needs);and
  • as a result of those needs is unable to protect himself or herself against the abuse or neglect or the risk of it.

The use of the term ‘at risk’ means that actual abuse, neglect or other kinds of harm do not necessarily need to occur, rather without interventions by services actual abuse and neglect are likely to occur.

‘Harm’ is defined as:

  • ill treatment this includes sexual abuse, neglect, emotional abuse and psychological abuse
  • the impairment of physical or mental health (including that suffered from seeing or hearing another person suffer ill treatment).
  • the impairment of physical intellectual, emotional, social or behavioural development (including that suffered from seeing or hearing another person suffer ill treatment).

‘Significant Harm’ There is no statutory definition of significant harm. Therefore, practitioners must:

‘Where the question of whether harm is significant turns on the child’s health or development, the child’s health or development is to be compared with that which could reasonably be expected of a similar child (Section 31(9),Children Act 1989.

Concerns about likely or actual significant harm to a child is the threshold for initiating s47 enquiries under the Children Act 1989.

The following is a non-exhaustive list of examples for each of the categories of harm, abuse and neglect included in vol 5 Working Together to Safeguard People: Volume 5 – Handling Individual Cases to Protect Children at Risk:

Physical abuse – hitting, slapping, over or misuse of medication, undue restraint, or inappropriate sanctions;

Emotional/psychological abuse – threats of harm or abandonment, coercive control, humiliation, verbal or racial abuse, isolation or withdrawal from services or supportive networks, witnessing abuse of others

Sexual abuse – forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening, including: physical contact, including penetrative or non-penetrative acts; non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, pornographic material or watching sexual activities or encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways;

Financial abuse – this category will be less prevalent for a child but indicators could be: not meeting their needs for care and support which are provided through direct payments; or complaints that personal property is missing.

Neglect – failure to meet basic physical, emotional or psychological needs which is likely to result in impairment of health or development.

For Signs and Indicators of Possible Abuse, Neglect and Harm in a Child please refer to the Wales Safeguarding Procedures: https://safeguarding.wales/chi/cp/c1p.p2.html

2.1 All schools and colleges have statutory duties to operate in a way that takes into account the need to safeguard and promote the well-being of children, and in the case of some adults, colleges. The legal responsibilities are set out in:

  • the common law duty of care
  • the duty to report
  • the duty arising from the contract of employment.

The arrangements that local authorities, governing bodies and proprietors have in place to comply with these statutory duties need to ensure:

  • reasonable measures are taken to minimise risks of harm to children’s well-being
  • appropriate actions are taken to address concerns about the well-being of a child or children, working to agreed local policies and procedures in full partnership with other local agencies.

2.2 Legislative Context

 

Section 175 of the Education Act 2002 requires school governing bodies, local education authorities and further education institutions to make arrangements to safeguard and promote the well-being of all children who are students at a school, or who are students under 18 years of age.

The Children Act 1989 and 2004 places a statutory duty on a range of organisations to make arrangements to ensure that their functions, and services provided on their behalf, are discharged having regard to the need to safeguard and promote the wellbeing of children.

The Governing body at Golftyn CP School will ensure that they are fully aware of the relevant legislation and guidance in relation to safeguarding children in their care and will have due regard for the following:

  • Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014
  • Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015
  • Rights of Children and Young Persons (Wales) Measure 2011 which encompasses the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
  • Human Rights Act 1998
  • Equality Act 2010
  • Modern Slavery Act 2015
  • Violence Against Women and Sexual Violence (Wales) Act 2015
  • Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015
  • Additional Learning Needs and Education Tribunal (Wales) Act 2018.

At Golftyn CP School we will follow the Wales Safeguarding Procedures 2019 that have been endorsed by the North Wales Safeguarding Children’s Board. Alongside these procedures, the school will follow Keeping Learners Safe Guidance document no: 265/2020 supported by any other guidance and protocols that have been endorsed and agreed by the North Wales Safeguarding Children’s Board in conjunction with this policy.

Failure to have arrangements in place as required by section 175 or to adhere to regulations made under section 157 of the 2002 Act, or to have regard to guidance issued by the Welsh Government, may be grounds for the Welsh Ministers to take action against local authorities, or governing bodies. The responsibility for making sure these arrangements are in place is the duty of the local authority or the governing body. Individuals do not have direct liability.

 

2.3 Statutory Duty to Report

The Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014 places a duty to report both children and adults that are at risk of abuse or neglect.

In line with the Wales Safeguarding Procedures 2019, a duty to report to the local authority will be taken to mean a referral to social services who, alongside the police, have statutory powers to investigate suspected abuse or neglect. The use of the term ‘at risk’ means that actual abuse or neglect does not need to have occurred, rather early interventions to protect an adult at risk of abuse should be considered to prevent actual abuse and neglect.

A report must be made whenever there are concerns about a child under the age of 18 years who:

  • is experiencing or is at risk of abuse, neglect or other kinds of harm; and
  • has needs for care and support (whether or not the authority is meeting any of those needs).

A report should be made whenever there are concerns for an adult at risk who:

  • is experiencing or is at risk of abuse or neglect,
  • has needs for care and support (whether or not the authority is meeting any of those needs), and
  • as a result of those needs is unable to protect himself or herself against the abuse or neglect or the risk of it.

If any member of staff has knowledge, concerns or suspicions that a child or adult at risk is suffering, has suffered or is likely to be at risk of harm, it is their responsibility to ensure that the concerns are referred to the DSP. THIS IS NOT A MATTER OF PERSONAL CHOICE.

2.4 Related Policies

In addition to this safeguarding policy, there are other policies that have relevance to safeguarding which our school will monitor to ensure there is consistency and coherence in the way we effectively safeguard our learners. Examples of other relevant school policies include:

  • Attendance
  • Intimate care
  • Recruitment and selection
  • Anti-bullying
  • Physical intervention
  • Confidentiality
  • Online safety
  • Preventing radicalisation
  • Behaviour
  • Staff code of conduct
  • Education Visits Policy

 

Add amend as required

3.1 At Golftyn CP School we recognise that high self-esteem, confidence, supportive friends and good lines of communication with a trusted adult help to safeguard learners. Early identification and intervention are key to meeting the needs of children by preventing or delaying circumstances that might lead to social services’ intervention. This includes the identification of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and action to prevent or mitigate them, or supporting the child to build resilience. Building resilience in children and young people is central to the whole-school approach to emotional and mental well-being.

Prevention work should be integrated, where practical, into all aspects of school life and addressed at all appropriate points in the curriculum. This will help create a positive ethos where learners have a safe environment in which to learn and have the opportunity and confidence to share concerns with others. Discussing the issues and listening to the views and opinions of peers can help change attitudes and provide support. When discussing sensitive issues, these need to be presented in a balanced way and ethical issues discussed objectively. However, it is equally important to equip learners to take responsibility for their behaviour.

Golftyn CP School will therefore:

  • establish and maintain an ethos where children feel secure and are encouraged to talk, and are listened to;
  • ensure children know that there are adults in the school whom they can approach if they are worried or in difficulty;
  • include in the curriculum, activities and opportunities for Relationships and Sexuality Education (RSE) which equip children with the skills they need to stay safe from abuse and to know to whom to turn for help; and
  • include in the curriculum, material which will help children develop realistic attitudes to the responsibilities of adult life, particularly with regard to childcare and parenting skills.
  • build relationships with other agencies and ensure early and appropriate referrals for support and intervention are made before risks escalate
  • take a whole-school (setting) approach to well-being which will incorporate safeguarding and preventative measures to support children and families.

 

4.1 The Role of the Local Authority

The Local authority must ensure that an appropriate senior officer within the education department is designated to have lead responsibility for discharging its safeguarding duties in education. The range of responsibilities attributed to this designated officer post should be consistent with the need to ensure that effective safeguarding arrangements operate across the authority’s education functions. In Flintshire, the Designated Lead for Safeguarding in Education is Vicky Barlow, Senior Manager for School Improvement.

The local authority has responsibilities at three levels: strategic, support and operational as identified in Keeping Learners Safe 2020. Flintshire County Council will plan, co-ordinate services and allocate resources working in partnership with other agencies in order to meet these requirement.

On a strategic level the local authority should ensure:

·         They allocate resources to support the work of the regional Safeguarding Childrens Board
·         Their senior officers, including education officers, represent the authority on the SCB and the authority makes an effective contribution to planning coordinated services to meet the needs of children
·         They work with other agencies to put in place, and support, effective partnership working
·         They build positive working relationships and ensure effective communication with other services within the local authority
·         Resources are allocated to enable the local authority and maintained schools to discharge their responsibilities for safeguarding children satisfactorily
·         Effective liaison with the appropriate diocesan authorities in respect of arrangements for voluntary-aided or foundation schools in their area
·         Maintained schools’ compliance with this guidance is monitored, particularly regarding employment checks (including temporary and agency staff), the existence and operation of appropriate policies and procedures and the training of staff, including the senior person with designated safeguarding responsibility in schools and their supervision
·         They bring deficiencies to the attention of the governing body of the school and advise upon the action needed to remedy them
·         Inter-agency problems are resolved as soon as possible after they are identified
·         They play a full part in child practice reviews in accordance with Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014: Working Together to Safeguard People: Volume 2 Child Practice Reviews review and revise procedures and training in light of the findings of reviews, and disseminate information about relevant findings to those with responsibility for child protection in the authority and maintained schools.

On a support level the local authority should:

·         Ensure that induction training for all new staff working in an education setting in the authority, and for staff who will work with children in maintained schools, includes safeguarding training that will enable them to fulfil their responsibilities effectively in respect of child protection, including responding to disclosures of abuse, neglect and other kinds of harm appropriately and sensitively.

·         The local authority should also ensure that suitable refresher training is completed to keep staff knowledge and skills up to date.

·         Governors of maintained schools should also receive appropriate training on their safeguarding responsibilities and in handling allegations of abuse against school staff
·         Ensure that further training in inter-agency working to safeguard children, either provided by the SCB or meeting the standards set out by the board, is available for all staff appointed to have responsibility for safeguarding. Suitable refresher training should also be available and meet the standard set by the SCB
·         Maintain a record of all DSPs and designated governors for safeguarding within schools in their area, as well as the training undertaken and the dates on which training was undertaken
·         Oversee the supervision arrangements for DSPs in the authority to ensure the role does not have a detrimental effect on their well-being and they have an opportunity to reflect on their practice
·         Provide model policies and procedures for maintained schools on all aspects of child protection, including recruitment, and procedures for dealing with allegations of abuse against staff and volunteers. The policies and procedures must be consistent with Welsh Government guidance (in particular the model policy and statutory guidance issued in Disciplinary and dismissal procedures for school staff: Revised guidance for governing bodies, circular 002/2020
·         Provide advice, guidance and support about dealing with individual cases to maintained schools and DSPs in those establishments. Where necessary, the authority should act on their behalf to resolve any difficulties with, or obtain appropriate support from, SCB partner agencies
·         Liaise with maintained schools, agencies and colleges to ensure referrals are made to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)/Education Workforce Council (EWC)
·         Have in place arrangements to support staff within the authority and maintained schools who have designated lead responsibility for safeguarding. These arrangements should encourage and foster a good understanding and working relationship between them, children’s social workers and staff in other agencies involved in safeguarding children, to develop effective partnership working.

On an operational level, the local authority should:

·         Promote safe recruitment procedures and support schools to make sure that all appropriate checks are carried out on new staff and unsupervised volunteers who will work with children, including DBS checks
·         safeguard and promote the well-being of children who have not been allocated a school place, or are excluded from school, including those being educated in pupil referral units, alternative provision or via the home tutor service
·         seek to build effective relationships with home educators that function to safeguard the educational interests and the well-being of children. Doing so will provide parents/carers with access to any support that is available and allow authorities to understand the parents’/carers’ educational provision.
·         have in place arrangements for overseeing allegations of abuse against members of staff in the authority, schools or colleges. The Welsh Government has issued guidance, Disciplinary and dismissal procedures for school staff: Revised guidance for governing bodies
·         work with schools and SCB partner agencies to ensure that allegations are dealt with quickly, fairly and consistently, and that appropriate referrals are made to the DBS and the EWC
·         ensure that the authority’s staff who work with children (including any staff carrying out functions on behalf of the authority) receive training that equips them to carry out their responsibilities for child protection effectively.

 

4.2 Responsibilities of the Governing Body

 

Governing bodies are accountable for ensuring effective policies and procedures are in place to safeguard and promote the well-being of children in accordance with Keeping Learners Safe 2020, and monitoring its compliance with the guidance. Governing bodies of maintained schools must ensure that they:

  • have effective safeguarding (including child protection) policies and procedures in place that are:
  • in accordance with local authority guidance, locally agreed inter-agency procedures and national minimum standards;
  • inclusive of services that extend beyond the school/college day (e.g. boarding accommodation, community activities on school premises, etc.);
  • reviewed at least annually;
  • made available to parents or carers on request; and
  • provided in a format appropriate to the understanding of children, particularly where schools cater for children with additional learning needs.
  • operate safe recruitment procedures that take account of the need to safeguard children, including arrangements to ensure that all appropriate checks are carried out on new staff and unsupervised volunteers who will work with children, including relevant checks;
  • ensure that the head teacher and all other permanent staff and volunteers who work with children undertake the training necessary to carry out their responsibilities for safeguarding effectively, which is kept up-to-date by refresher training;
  • give clear guidance to temporary staff and volunteers providing cover during short-term absences and who will be working with children
  • ensure that the governing body remedies without delay any deficiencies or weaknesses regarding any child protection arrangements brought to its attention; and
  • ensure that the DSP, the designated governor and the chair of governors undertake training in inter-agency working that is provided by, or to standards agreed by, the SCB, as well as refresher training to keep their knowledge and skills up to date, in addition to basic safeguarding training.
  • All members of governing bodies should undertake relevant safeguarding and child protection training within the first term of starting the role. This ensures they have the knowledge and information needed to perform their functions and understand their wider safeguarding responsibilities. Members of the governing body should complete, as a minimum, the Keeping learners safe These support all staff in education settings to understand their safeguarding responsibilities as set out in Keeping Learners Safe guidance. There are five separate modules available on Hwb.

4.3 Responsibilities of the Designated Governor for Safeguarding

 

The governing body is responsible for ensuring the school has effective policies and procedures in place for safeguarding children and monitoring the school’s compliance with them. It is recommended that each governing body has a nominated governor for child protection to promote the importance of safeguarding and child protection. The child protection governor will support and assist the governing body to have a better understanding and knowledge of child protection and safeguarding provision within the school.

Schools should identify a designated governor for safeguarding, for example to:

  • confirming that the school has a Safeguarding Policy, which is consistent with the Wales Safeguarding Procedures 2019, that it is reviewed annually and is readily accessible to all members of staff;
  • being familiar with the schools Safeguarding Policy, the Wales Safeguarding Procedures 2019 and keeping informed of child protection and safeguarding initiatives, nationally and locally from the Welsh Government, Regional Consortium and Local Authority;
  • ensure the governing body undertakes an annual review of safeguarding policies and procedures which includes consideration of how its responsibilities have been discharged.
  • ensuring that the school has an up-to-date and agreed staff disciplinary procedure for dealing with allegations of misconduct against staff, including child protection allegations, that complies with the relevant legislation including the appointment of an independent investigator, and has regard to Welsh Government guidance and locally agreed inter-agency procedures;
  • being familiar with Estyn’s guidance for safeguarding;
  • meeting as and when required, by appointment, with the designated member of staff for child protection to monitor the effectiveness of the Safeguarding Policy in the school (in accordance with the Governor Visits to Schools policy);
  • working with the Additional Learning Needs link governor (if appropriate);
  • helping to ensure that the school works well with relevant agencies and individuals;
  • helping to ensure that accurate records are being kept by the school and that the child protection file is up to date;
  • being aware of the number of pupils at the school currently on the child protection register;
  • checking that staff and governors are appropriately trained and that all members of staff and governors know what to do if they have any child protection concerns
  • ensuring safe recruitment procedures are in place and appropriate checks are being carried out on new members of staff and volunteers;
  • ensuring aspects of safeguarding are incorporated within curriculum delivery ;
  • keeping Safeguarding knowledge up to date by attending governor relevant training.

 

4.4 Responsibilities of the Head teacher

Head teachers of all schools should foster a nurturing culture within the school and promote open communication between staff and pupils on safeguarding matters. The head teacher must ensure that all staff (including supply teachers and volunteers):

  • fully implement and follow the safeguarding policies and procedures adopted by the governing body
  • have both time and access to sufficient resources to enable them to discharge their responsibilities, including taking part in strategy discussions and other inter-agency meetings, and contributing to the assessment of children;
  • understand the procedures for safeguarding children and feel able to raise concerns about poor or unsafe practice and confident that such concerns will be addressed sensitively and effectively in a timely manner in accordance with agreed Welsh Government Procedures for Whistleblowing in Schools and Model Policy; as part of their induction, are given a written statement about the school policy and procedures and the name and contact details of the DSP; and
  • The head teacher must appoint the appropriate number of DSPs and deputy DSPs for their education setting.
  • The head teacher should ensure that the DSP:
  • is given sufficient time and resources to carry out the role effectively, which should be explicitly defined in the post holder’s job description
  • has access to the required levels of training and support to undertake the role, including online safety training
  • has time to attend and provide reports and advice to case conferences and other inter-agency meetings as require
  • has the appropriate IT equipment to carry out the role effectively.

 

 

 

4.5 Responsibilities of the Designated Safeguarding Person (DSP)

 

Each school must identify a DSP with lead responsibility for managing all safeguarding concerns. The DSP must be available to discuss safeguarding concerns; should be consulted, when possible, as to whether to raise a safeguarding concern with the local authority; and will manage any immediate actions required to ensure the individual at risk is safe from abuse. All practitioners should know who to contact in their education setting for advice and they should not hesitate to discuss their concerns no matter how insignificant they may appear.

The DSP need not be a teacher, but must be a senior member of the school leadership team with the status and authority within the organisation to carry out the duties of the post, including committing resources to safeguarding matters and directing other staff. The DSP could also be a single appointment within the senior team and need not carry other duties.

Each DSP must have at least one deputy who has equal status and access to the same training. The number of deputies will depend on the education setting, and should reflect the proportion of work involved and the size and scale of the education setting. Larger education settings should have a team of staff working together and split-site education settings should have a DSP available on each site.

The DSP should possess the necessary skills and qualities for the role, which will have a strong focus on communication with learners and professionals. This can be a demanding role and will require a level of expertise, knowledge, resources and support.

Handling individual cases may be a responsibility delegated to other members of staff, but it is important that a senior member of staff take overall responsibility for this area of work. The DSP should always be kept informed of the progress and the outcome of all cases. All staff taking on these responsibilities should be fully trained and skilled in their responsibilities.

In education settings with a high number of safeguarding concerns, consideration should be given to appointing a full-time DSP with relevant skills and experience. An alternative arrangement might involve the delegation of day-to-day responsibilities while the DSP retains overall responsibility, as described above.

The DSP should have adequate support and supervision to undertake their role effectively. The supervision should support the DSP with the emotional impact of their role and provide an opportunity for reflection on their practice. This could be done on an individual or group basis but the DSP should be provided with an opportunity for individual support where necessary.

The DSP must know how to recognise and identify the signs of abuse, neglect and other types of harm, irrespective of whether it is online or offline, and know when it is appropriate to make a report to the local authority (or police where the child/children are in immediate danger).

The DSP role involves providing advice and support to other staff, record-keeping, working with family members or carers, making referrals to children’s services and attending statutory meetings, as well as liaising with the SCB and working with other agencies as necessary. The DSP role is not to investigate allegations, but they must keep the head teacher informed of all safeguarding concerns raised in the school.

The DSP should also consider how safeguarding more widely can be addressed and ensure preventative measures are adopted in the education setting. This part of the role will include building relationships with other agencies, as well as ensuring staff and learners are informed about risks and how to access support. This will form part of the whole-school (setting) approach and learning through the new curriculum.

The DSP will take responsibility for the education setting’s safeguarding and child protection practice, policy, procedures and professional development, working with other agencies as necessary. The DSP should ensure the school’s safeguarding policy is updated and reviewed annually, and work with the governing body or proprietor regarding this.

The DSP is responsible for ensuring that parents / carers see copies of the safeguarding policy. This may help avoid the potential for later conflict by alerting them to the role of the school and the fact that reports may be made to the local authority where there are safeguarding concerns. Many educational settings include information about this at induction meetings for new parents / carers, in their prospectus and on their website.

The DSP should ensure that the school completes the Keeping Learners Safe Safeguarding Audit Tool, to support a whole setting approach to safeguarding and provide a benchmark against which to seek to continually improve safeguarding approaches and structures. The Audit Tool should be regularly reviewed to ensure that there is constant reflection, learning and updating of processes within the school. The Audit Tool can be downloaded from the link below:

https://gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2020-11/annex-3-safeguarding-audit-tool.docx

Note: All Flintshire schools are required to submit the Safeguarding Audit Tool to the LA for monitoring purposes on an annual basis.

It is effective practice for the DSP to provide an annual briefing and regular updates at staff meetings on any safeguarding and/or child protection issues or changes in local procedures. This ensures that all staff are kept up to date and are regularly reminded of their responsibilities as well as the school’s policies and procedures. Many schools find it helpful to discuss safeguarding regularly at staff meetings so that awareness remains high.

The DSP should liaise with the designated governor for safeguarding so that the designated governor can report on safeguarding issues, irrespective of whether the issue is online or offline, to the governing body. Reports to the governing body should not be about specific child protection cases, but should review the safeguarding policies and procedures. It is good practice for the nominated governor and the DSP to present the report together.

4.6 Responsibilities of All Staff

All staff have a responsibility to provide a safe environment and to identify children who are suffering, or are at risk of suffering, abuse, neglect or harm irrespective of where this happens (online or offline, on or off the education setting premises).

All staff then have a responsibility to take appropriate action, working with other services as needed. In addition to working with the DSP, staff members should be aware that they might be asked to support social workers to take decisions about individual children.

All staff members should be aware of the signs of abuse, neglect and other kinds of harm. Signs can be physical but are often more subtle such as a change in behaviour or becoming withdrawn. Small signs can be part of a pattern so it is important that staff do not dismiss anything as not being relevant or big enough. If all staff mention changes or observations to the DSP they can build a picture that might otherwise go unnoticed.

Where staff members have concerns that a child is at risk of abuse, neglect or other harm they should raise these with the DSP. This is not a matter of individual choice. Anyone working in an education setting and employed by a local authority, local health board or trust, police or probation service must report to the local authority where there is reasonable cause to believe a child to be at risk of abuse, neglect or other kind of harm. There is a legal duty to record and report your concerns on the day the allegation/concern has been raised. This will usually be done through the DSP but the safety of the child must be the priority so there may be occasions when staff will need to contact Children’s Services directly where there is an immediate concern.

All staff are reminded that they cannot promise confidentiality following disclosure. It is important that each member of staff deals with this sensitively and explains to the child that they must inform the appropriate people who can help the child, but they will only tell those who need to know in order to be able to help.  Staff need to be mindful that it may have taken significant courage on the part of the child to disclose the information and they may also be experiencing conflicting emotions, involving feelings of guilt, embarrassment, disloyalty (if the abuser is someone close) and hurt.

Concerns should always lead to help and support, either through a report to social services, or direct support through the school. The DSP should share the following information with the staff member making the report and the head teacher:

  • proposed initial action, including signposting or that no further action will be taken; and
  • who will be taking action.

5.1 At Golftyn CP School we will follow the Wales Safeguarding Procedures 2019 that have been endorsed by the North Wales Safeguarding Children’s Board alongside any other guidance and protocol that have been endorsed and agreed by the board. In line with Keeping Learners Safe 2020 the school will:

  • ensure every member of staff and every governor knows:
  • the name of the DSP and their role, the Local Authority Designated Lead for Safeguarding in Education and the designated governor for safeguarding ;
  • that they have an individual responsibility for reporting children at risk and protection concerns to social services, or to the police, within the timescales agreed with the Regional Safeguarding Board; and
  • how to take forward those concerns where the DSP is unavailable.
  • ensure that all members of staff are aware of the need to be alert to signs of abuse and neglect, and know how to respond to a learner who may disclose abuse or neglect.
  • ensure that members of staff who are Education Workforce Council of Wales (EWC) registrants are aware of the Code of Professional Conduct and Practice for Registrants with the Education Workforce Council and the expectation within the Code that registrant has regard to the safety and well-being of learners in their care and related content;
  • ensure that parents /carers have an understanding of the responsibility placed on the school and staff for safeguarding and child protection by setting out its obligations in the school prospectus;
  • provide Basic Awareness Safeguarding (Level 1) training for all staff so that they:
  • understand their personal responsibility;
  • know the agreed local procedures and their duty to respond;
  • are aware of the need to be vigilant in identifying cases of abuse and neglect;
  • know how to support a child who discloses abuse or neglect
  • Understand the role online behaviours may have in each of the above.
  • notify the local authority’s social services team if:
  • a learner on the child protection register is excluded, either for a fixed term or permanently; or
  • there is an unexplained absence of a learner on the child protection register of more than two days duration from school (or one day following a weekend).
  • work to develop effective links with relevant agencies and co-operate as required with their enquiries regarding child protection matters including attendance at initial review and child protection conferences and core groups and the submission of written reports to the conferences;
  • keep records of concerns about children (noting the date, event and action taken), even where there is no need to refer the matter to the local authority immediately;
  • ensure all records are kept secure and in locked locations (limit access if using an electronic system for recording concerns);
  • adhere to the procedures set out in the Schools Disciplinary Policy;
  • ensure that recruitment and selection procedures are made in accordance with Welsh Government‘s Keeping Learners Safe guidance.

5.2 Recording Concerns

Suspicion about a child being at risk may take the form of concerns rather than known facts. Concerns about a child at risk can arise in many different contexts, including when a child is already known to social services. It is important that these concerns are logged, recorded and appropriately monitored by the member of staff and/or the DSP. This ensures that a coherent picture exists of the likelihood of abuse, neglect and other kinds of harm and

provides support for a report to social services and any subsequent action.

As detailed in Keeping Learners Safe 2020 ‘All Education Settings must have a suitable system in place to support effective data collection of children suspected to be at risk’. There are a number of software packages to support schools to collect data internally about safeguarding concerns relating to children. These packages can support staff to log concerns and the DSP to identify patterns of abuse, neglect, or other kinds of harm. At Golftyn CP School we use the following system: CPOMS in school. Please refer to 6.1 for further information regarding Information Sharing.

5.3 Reporting

Accurate, concise and clear record-keeping in straightforward language is an essential part of an individual employee and professional’s accountability, and underpins good child protection practice. All agencies involved in safeguarding and promoting the well-being of children must have policies and procedures specifying arrangements for the retention, storage and destruction of electronic and paper case records. The policies should ensure that case records are stored safely and able to be retrieved as required.

When a child has made a disclosure or a concern is identified, the member of staff or volunteer should:

  • Make brief notes as soon as possible after the conversation / observation.
  • Not destroy the original notes in case they are needed by a court.
  • Record the date, time, place and any noticeable non-verbal behaviour and the words used by the child.
  • If required, draw a diagram to indicate the position of any bruising or other injury.
  • Record statements and observations rather than interpretations or assumptions.
  • Give all records to the Designated Senior Person.

As outlined above, a report that a child may be at risk online or offline must be made to social services as soon as a concern is identified; this must be within 24 hours. Outside of office hours, reports must be made to social services’ emergency duty service or to the police.

Where a report is made by telephone, it must be confirmed in writing by email initially, with the completed report submitted within 24 hours. Please refer to Appendix 1 – Procedure for Making a Referral into Children’s First Contact Team.

Where available the report should be made using the North Wales Children’s Services Multiagency Referral Form. The report must include basic/core information, the cause for concern and any relevant information held by the agency.

The North Wales referral form is accessible on the following link: https://www.northwalessafeguardingboard.wales/north-wales-referral-form-children-and-families/ which must be emailed to:ChildProtectionReferral@flintshire.gov.uk

Anyone working in an education setting should be aware that they cannot remain anonymous should they make a report.

The DSP role is not to investigate allegations, however there may be times when a member of staff  will be asked by Social Services / Police to clarify the accounts given by a child. This is in order to give some clarity to important detail; this will assist the decision maker in respect of threshold being met and likewise, significant harm being established as a real concern.

  • Confidentiality

The Head teacher / DSP will only disclose any information about a learner to other members of staff on a need-to-know basis. There is a duty of confidentiality to share information with other agencies in order to safeguard children.

The duty of confidentiality is not absolute and may be breached where this is in the best interests of the child and in the wider public interest. If professionals judge that disclosure is necessary to protect the child or other children from a risk of serious harm, confidentiality may be breached.

All staff must understand that they cannot promise a child to keep secrets which might compromise the child’s safety or well-being. Staff have a professional responsibility to share relevant information about the protection of learners with the designated statutory agencies when a child is experiencing child wellbeing concerns.

It is important that each member of staff deals with this sensitively and explains to the child that they must inform the appropriate people who can help the child, but they will only tell those who need to know in order to be able to help.

Staff should reassure the child and tell them that their situation will not be common knowledge within the school.  Staff should be aware that it may well have taken significant courage on the part of the child to disclose the information and they may also be experiencing conflicting emotions, involving feelings of guilt, embarrassment, disloyalty (if the abuser is someone close) and hurt.

5.5 Engaging in the child protection process

 

Any member of staff making a report may be asked to complete some, or all, of the following tasks. The school should ensure that staff have sufficient time and other necessary resources to discharge these tasks effectively and staff should be prepared and willing to:

  • assist in the child protection enquiries under section 47 of the Children’s Act1989
  • attend the child protection conference
  • provide a written report for the child protection conference
  • contribute to the initial and core assessments
  • attend core group meetings.

Where a child is the subject of a care and support protection plan, the DSP should be involved in the preparation of the plan. The education setting’s role and responsibilities in contributing to actions to safeguard the child, and promoting their well-being, should be clearly identified.

 

The North Wales Safeguarding Children’s Board are required to conduct a Child Practice Review in the event of a significant incident where abuse or neglect of a child is known or suspected. Schools may need to be involved in the Child Practice Review process working closely with Education and Children’s Services in such circumstances. Similarly, schools are expected to engage with Flintshire and Wrexham’s Strategic Missing, Exploited and Trafficked (MET) meetings as required.

 

6.1 Information sharing is central to good safeguarding practice. All staff working at Golftyn CP School should be aware of their responsibilities under the UK’s data protection legislation. Every maintained school and college in the UK is required to appoint a data protection officer (DPO).

Schools must share information in accordance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the Data Protection Act 2018, referred to as the UK’s data protection legislation. One of the specific circumstances which provides for information sharing is in order to prevent abuse or serious harm to others. The GDPR and Data Protection Act 2018 do not prevent, or limit, the sharing of information for the purposes of keeping children and young people safe.

A key theme emerging from Child Practice Reviews is the need for better multi-agency communication and information sharing. When information is not shared in a timely and effective way decisions about how to respond may be ill informed and this can lead to poor safeguarding practice and leave children at risk of significant harm.

In schools, it is the responsibility of the DSP to keep detailed, accurate and secure written records of children where there are safeguarding concerns. These records are confidential and should be kept separately from other learner records. They should include a chronology of concerns, reports, meetings, phone calls and emails.

Where a child leaves a school, the DSP must ensure that any child protection records are copied to the new school immediately; but transferred separately from the main learner file to ensure confidentiality. The Education Welfare Service must also be notified. This will ensure the new school is alert to any risks to the child so they can support them as appropriate. Effective communication between DSPs in both schools will be important to ensure the child is not at risk during the transition phase.

The Wales Accord on the Sharing of Personal Information (WASPI) outlines organisational responsibilities in relation to the sharing of sensitive information. www.waspi.org/

All staff at Golftyn CP School will seek advice from the DSP and/or the Head teacher with regard to the sharing of any information. DSP’s should use their judgement when making decisions about what information to share, and should follow organisation procedures. The most important consideration is whether sharing information is likely to support the safeguarding and protection of a child.

 

6.2 Principles

There are a number of principles that can assist all staff in conjunction with the DSP in making decisions about sharing information:

Necessary and proportionate – When taking decisions about what information to share, you should consider how much information you need to release. Not sharing more data than is necessary to be of use is a key element of the GDPR and Data Protection Act 2018, and you should consider the impact of disclosing information on the information subject and any third parties. Information must be proportionate to the need and level of risk.

Relevant – Only information that is relevant to the purposes should be shared with those who need it. This allows others to do their job effectively and make informed decisions.

Adequate – Information should be adequate for its purpose. Information should be of the right quality to ensure that it can be understood and relied upon.

Accurate – Information should be accurate and up to date and should clearly distinguish between fact and opinion. If the information is historical then this should be explained.

Timely – Information should be shared in a timely fashion to reduce the risk of missed opportunities to offer support and protection to a child. Timeliness is key in emergency situations and it may not be appropriate to seek consent for information sharing if it could cause delays and therefore place a child or young person at increased risk of harm. Practitioners should ensure that sufficient information is shared, as well as consider the urgency with which to share it.

Secure – Wherever possible, information should be shared in an appropriate, secure way. Practitioners must always follow their organisation’s policy on security for handling personal information.

Record – Information sharing decisions should be recorded, whether or not the decision is taken to share. If the decision is to share, reasons should be cited including what information has been shared and with whom, in line with organisational procedures. If the decision is not to share, it is good practice to record the reasons for this decision and discuss them with the requester. In line with each organisation’s own retention policy, the information should not be kept any longer than is necessary. In some rare circumstances, this may be indefinitely, but if this is the case, there should be a review process scheduled at regular intervals to ensure data is not retained where it is unnecessary to do so.

For further guidance please refer to: Working Together to Safeguard People: Non-statutory guide on information sharing to safeguard children 38137 Working together to safeguard people: Non-statutory guide on information sharing to safeguard children (gov.wales)

 

7.1. At Golftyn CP School we recognise that children who are at risk, suffer abuse or witness violence may be deeply affected by this. This school may be the only stable, secure and predictable element in the lives of children at risk. Nevertheless, when at school their behaviour may be challenging and defiant or they may be withdrawn.

The school will endeavour to support the learner through:

  • The content of the curriculum to encourage self-esteem and self-motivation
  • The school ethos which: promotes a positive, supportive and secure environment; and gives learners a sense of being valued
  • The school’s behaviour policy, which is aimed at supporting vulnerable pupils in the school. All staff will agree on a consistent approach that focuses on the behavioural outcome of the child but does not damage the individual’s sense of self-worth. The school will endeavour to ensure that the learner knows that some behaviour is unacceptable but that they are valued and not to be blamed for any abuse which has occurred
  • Liaison with other agencies who support the learner such as local authority officers including Educational Psychology Service, Nurture Support or the Education Welfare Service – Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services and advocacy services;
  • Keeping records and notifying the local authority as soon as there is a recurrence of a concern.
  • When a learner on the child protection register leaves, we will transfer information to  the new provider immediately and inform Social Services.

 

7.2 Anti-Bullying

Under the Children Act 1989, a bullying incident should be addressed as a child protection concern when there is ‘reasonable cause to suspect that a child is suffering, or is likely to suffer, significant harm’. Where this is the case, staff should report their concerns to their DSP.

Even where safeguarding is not considered to be an issue, schools may need to draw on a range of external services to support the pupil who is experiencing bullying, or to tackle any underlying issue, which has contributed to a child engaging in bullying.

At Golftyn CP School we are committed to providing a secure and caring environment for all. Bullying, in any form, will not be tolerated.

The Welsh Government Rights, respect, equality: Statutory guidance for governing bodies of maintained schools (2019) is reflected in our Anti bullying policy which can be found on our school website. golftyncp.wales

7.3 Physical Contact with Pupils including restraint

 

Under section 93 of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 all school staff are able to

use such force as is reasonable in the circumstances to prevent a child or young person from doing, or continuing to do, any of the following:

  • committing any offence (or, for a learner under the age of criminal responsibility, what would be an offence for an older learner)
  • causing personal injury to, or damage to the property of, any person (including self-harm to the learner)
  • prejudicing the maintenance of good order and discipline at the school or among any leaners receiving education at the school, whether during a teaching session or otherwise.

There is no legal definition of when it is reasonable to use force. That will always depend on the precise circumstances of individual cases. To be judged lawful, the force used would need to be in proportion to the consequences it is intended to prevent. The degree of force used should be the minimum needed to achieve the desired result. Use of force could not be justified to prevent trivial misbehaviour.

Physical Intervention and Restraint is normally carried out by staff who have been trained in appropriate procedures but in exceptional circumstances, may be undertaken by any member of staff as referenced above. The school expects every effort to be made to deescalate a situation, prior to physical intervention. The physical intervention scheme used by the school is Team Teach. Appropriate support is provided for both learners and staff who are involved in physical intervention.

Please refer to the Physical Intervention Policy for further information which is consistent with the Welsh Government’s guidance on Safe and effective intervention – use of reasonable force and searching for weapons. This can be found on our school website: golftyncp.wales

 

 

  • Children with Additional Learning Needs (ALN)

 

Sensory impaired and disabled children are at an increased risk of abuse, neglect and harm compared with their peers. Staff should understand that children with additional learning needs are at increased risk and are also less likely to receive the protection and support they need when they have been abused. Staff who work with children with an additional learning need, such as a profound and multiple disability, sensory impairment or emotional and behavioural problem need to be particularly sensitive to signs of abuse and provide for any additional safeguards needed to protect them. Please refer to the school’s ALN Policy for further information which can be found on our school website: golftyncp.wales ____________ (insert how/where ALN policy can be accessed e.g. website)

8.1 Modern Slavery

Modern slavery encompasses human trafficking and slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour. In human trafficking cases, exploitation can take many forms, including: sexual exploitation, forced labour, slavery, servitude, forced criminality and removal of organs.

Local Authorities are First Responder Organisations and, under section 52 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, have a statutory Duty to Notify the Home Office when they suspect a person may be a victim of modern slavery or human trafficking. This is discharged by referring a victim into the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) or by completing a notification to the Home Office when a potential adult victim does not consent to a referral.

Modern slavery is a form of child abuse and normal safeguarding/child protection procedures should always be followed in regard to any potential victim. Any concerns that a child or an adult at risk, may be experiencing any level of exploitation should be reported to the DSP immediately and action taken in accordance with the Wales Safeguarding Procedures. If you believe a child or adult is in immediate risk of harm, you should contact the police.

Please refer to ALL WALES PRACTICE GUIDE: ‘Safeguarding children who may be trafficked’ for indicators of trafficking and exploitation: https://www.safeguarding.wales/chi/c6/c6.p3.html

The following guidance: Modern Slavery – Statutory Guidance for England and Wales Home Office June 2021 can also provide helpful information accessible on the link below:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/993172/Modern_Slavery_Statutory_Guidance__EW__Non-Statutory_Guidance__SNI__v2.3.pdf

8.2 Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)

CSE is a form of child sexual abuse which involves an element of exchange. Any child can be sexually exploited irrespective of gender, ethnicity or sexuality. CSE can be perpetrated in many different ways ranging from the seemingly consensual relationship where sex is exchanged for affection or gifts, to serious organised crime by gangs and groups. What marks out exploitation is an imbalance of power in the relationship. The perpetrator always holds some kind of power over the victim which increases as the exploitative relationship develops.

Sexual exploitation involves varying degrees of coercion, intimidation or enticement, including unwanted pressure from peers to have sex, sexual bullying and may be part of a complex picture of interrelated safeguarding issues. However, it also important to recognise that some young people who are being sexually exploited do not exhibit any external signs of this abuse.

Any concerns that a child may be experiencing any level of exploitation should be reported to the DSP immediately and take action in accordance with the Wales Safeguarding Procedures. If you believe a child is in immediate risk of harm, you should contact the police.

Please refer to ALL WALES PRACTICE GUIDE: ‘Safeguarding children from child sexual exploitation (cse) for further information: https://safeguarding.wales/chi/c6/c6.p10.html

 

8.3 Child Criminal Exploitation (CCE)

‘Child Criminal Exploitation is common in county lines and occurs where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, control, manipulate or deceive a child or young person under the age of 18. The victim may have been criminally exploited even if the activity appears consensual. Child Criminal Exploitation does not always involve physical contact; it can also occur through the use of technology.’ CCE includes a number of types of exploitation, including forced labour, forced theft, benefit fraud, acquisitive crime, drug cultivation and production, and county lines cases.

If a member of staff has concerns that a child may be a victim of Child Criminal Exploitation they should be referred to the DSP. If you believe a child is in immediate risk of harm, you should contact the police.

Please refer to ALL WALES PRACTICE GUIDE: ‘Safeguarding children from Child Criminal Exploitation’ (CCE) for further information:  https://www.safeguarding.wales/chi/c6/c6.p1.html

8.4 Peer-on-peer abuse and harmful sexual behaviour

Sexual abuse can happen between children of any age and sex, and takes many forms along a continuum ranging from sexual harassment through to contact sexual abuse, including peer sexual exploitation and harmful sexual behaviour. Peer sexual abuse involves children of similar ages/year groups whereas other types of harmful sexual behaviour will involve a large difference in age. Children’s sexual behaviour exists on a wide continuum, from normal and developmentally expected to inappropriate, problematic, abusive and violent. Professionals working with children in an education setting require understanding of this continuum of behaviours to ensure appropriate intervention. Please refer to Brook Traffic Light Tool for further information https://www.brook.org.uk/product/traffic-light-tool/ and information for parents and carers from the Lucy Faithful Foundation is available on the link below: https://www.parentsprotect.co.uk/traffic-light-tools.htm

Harmful sexual behaviours’ (HSB) can be defined as: sexual behaviours expressed by children and young people under the age of 18 years that are developmentally inappropriate, may be harmful towards themselves or others, or be abusive towards another child, young person or adult. This definition of HSB includes both contact and non-contact behaviours (grooming, exhibitionism, voyeurism and sexting or recording images of sexual acts via smart phones or social media applications). Children with harmful sexual behaviour should be considered as children first and their care and support needs should be considered in the same way as for any child.

Any concerns that a child or an adult at risk, may be experiencing any level of exploitation should be reported to the DSP immediately and take action in accordance with the Wales Safeguarding Procedures. If you believe a child is in immediate risk of harm, you should contact the police.

Please refer to ALL WALES PRACTICE GUIDE: ‘Safeguarding children where there are concerns about harmful sexual behaviour’ for further information: https://safeguarding.wales/chi/c6/c6.p7.html

The ‘Guidance for education settings on peer sexual abuse, exploitation and harmful sexual behaviour’ provides practical tools to prevent and respond to instances of peer sexual abuse, exploitation and harmful sexual behaviour taking place both inside and out of school’ can also provide helpful information accessible on the link below:

https://gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2020-10/guidance-for-education-settings-on-peer-sexual-abuse-exploitation-and-harmful-sexual-behaviour.pdf

 

8.1 VAWDASV

 

Everyone working with children at Golftyn CP School should be alert to the frequent interrelationship between domestic abuse and the abuse and neglect of children. Where there is evidence of domestic abuse, the implications for any children in the household should be considered, including the possibility that the children may themselves be subject to violence or other harm.

The Welsh Government’s National Training Framework on Violence Against Women, domestic abuse and sexual violence issued in 2019 sets out the level of training appropriate for education-based staff. All staff at Golftyn CP School are required to undertake Group 1 VAWDASV training by September 2021 which is available on the Learning Pool platform as an eLearning module for all Flintshire County Council employees. Ask and Act Group 2 training is required for DSPs. All new staff must complete this course within the first term of their employment.

Where staff at Golftyn CP School have cause to believe that a child is at risk from, is the subject of, or is living in a household with, violence or abuse, or an adult is at risk, the DSP should be informed immediately and take action in accordance with the Wales Safeguarding Procedures.

Please refer to ALL WALES PRACTICE GUIDE: ‘Safeguarding children affected by domestic abuse’ for further information: https://safeguarding.wales/chi/c6/c6.p4.html

The Live Fear Free helpline is a free 24-hour confidential helpline that offers support and advice to all victims of abuse and violence, regardless of gender and sexual orientation, and to ‘concerned others’ such as practitioners, family members, friends, colleagues and members of the public. Practitioners can receive advice and guidance from the Live Fear Free Helpline (0808 8010 800)

 

8.2 Operation Encompass

 

In conjunction with North Wales Police, Golftyn CP School is participating in Operation Encompass to support children and young people who have been involved in or witness to a domestic abuse incident.  This is a police and education early intervention safeguarding partnership which supports children and young people who experience Domestic Abuse.

A key adult, is identified in school involved in Operation Encompass so they have knowledge of domestic abuse and its impact upon children that they can disseminate to all staff. At Golftyn CP School  this role is led by Nicola Cooper. For further support, please contact the Senior Learning Advisor – Engagement or the Senior Education Social Worker.

Operation Encompass means that the police will share information about Domestic Abuse incidents with our school PRIOR to the start of the next school day when they have been called to a domestic incident. The information our school receives also enables us to prepare for the child at school and ensure they have the support they need. The Operation Encompass information is stored in line with all other confidential safeguarding and child protection information.

For further information, please visit: https://www.operationencompass.org/

8.3 Forced Marriage

Forced marriage is an unacceptable cultural practice which is a form of violence against women and girls and is illegal in the UK. Forced marriage is a hidden crime, where families and communities collude, believing that they are upholding the cultural traditions and preserving family and community ‘honour’. Families believe they are protecting their children from ‘unsuitable’ relationships or that they are building stronger families and preserving cultural or religious beliefs.

If there is a suspicion that a child is at risk of honour-based violence or forced marriage, or an adult is at risk, the DSP should be informed immediately and take action in accordance with the Wales Safeguarding Procedures. If you believe a child or adult is in immediate risk of harm, you should contact the police.

Please refer to ALL WALES PRACTICE GUIDE: ‘Safeguarding children from harmful practices related to tradition, culture, religion or superstition’ for further information: https://safeguarding.wales/chi/c6/c6.p2.html

 

 

 

8.4 Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

Section 5B of the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003 introduces a mandatory reporting duty that requires teachers in England and Wales to report to the police known cases of FGM in under-18s that they identify in the course of their professional work. The Home Office guidance Multi-agency statutory guidance on female genital mutilation (2020) is clear that the duty applies to qualified teachers or persons who are employed or engaged to carry out teaching work in schools and colleges, and education practitioners regulated by the EWC.

All staff at Golftyn CP School will familiarise themselves with the culture and beliefs of families within our community. Potential harmful practices should never be overlooked on the basis of cultural sensitivity and staff should familiarise themselves with practices such as female genital mutilation (FGM) and forced marriage. Staff should be aware that girls might be taken abroad during the summer break to undergo FGM, as procedures take up to four weeks to heal. The procedure may therefore be performed before a girl returns to school at the start of the autumn term.

 

If there is a suspicion that a child is at risk of FGM, or an adult is at risk, the DSP should be informed immediately and take action in accordance with the Wales Safeguarding Procedures. If you believe a child or adult is in immediate risk of harm, you should contact the police.

Please refer to ALL WALES PRACTICE GUIDE: ‘Safeguarding children from harmful practices related to tradition, culture, religion or superstition’ for further information: https://safeguarding.wales/chi/c6/c6.p2.html

9.1 Online safety forms an integral part of a school’s safeguarding responsibilities as outlined in the Welsh Government’s Keeping Learners Safe Statutory Guidance. Golftyn CP School are committed to promoting the safe and positive use of the online world to children and young people. We are committed to make full use of social technologies to engage learners and improve learning outcomes, while also developing learners to be confident and competent digital citizens.

Golftyn CP School aims to build knowledge, skills and confidence among all learners with regard to online safety. Our school will achieve this by:

The implementation of the Digital competence framework (DCF), with digital skills, knowledge and attitudes embedded across the curriculum and integrated into lessons.

  • Planned online safety education programme which:
  • is taught across all age groups and progresses as learners grow and develop
  • is recurring and progressive as opposed to a one-off online safety session
  • supports learners in developing strategies for navigating the online world and developing resilience
  • is embedded across the curriculum
  • incorporates the use of relevant national initiatives and opportunities including Safer Internet Day (February) and Anti-bullying week (November).
  • Use of appropriate and up-to-date resources.
  • Resources, including visitors from external providers used appropriately to support and compliment internal provision.
  • Accessible to learners at different ages and abilities, such as learners with additional learning needs (ALN), or those with English as an additional language.
  • Learners are able to recall, explain and actively use online safety education.
  • Teachers have access to appropriate training, ensuring expertise and understanding underpins their teaching.

All staff at Golftyn CP School are aware of their individual responsibilities relating to the safeguarding of learners within the context of online Safety. Adherence to the Flintshire Acceptable Use Policy is the collective responsibility of all staff in conjunction with the schools Online Safety Policy (or equivalent).

For further information, please refer to the Acceptable Use Policy & Online Safety Policy which can be found on our school website: golftyncp.wales

Guidance from the UK Council for Internet Safety has been published in January 2020 to help Governing bodies challenge their schools to effectively safeguard their learners online:

 

https://hwb.gov.wales/zones/keeping-safe-online/five-key-questions-for-governing-bodies-to-help-challenge-their-schools-and-colleges-to-effectively-safeguard-their-learners/

 

9.2 360 Degree Safe Cymru

360 degree safe Cymru is a self-review tool for schools to assess and improve their online safety policy and practice. The interactive online tool can be accessed by logging into Hwb and then clicking on the 360 degree safe Cymru link on the Hwb home page. https://360safecymru.org.uk/dashboard/

Carrying out a review supports schools with planning and making necessary changes

to policies, online safety education programmes, technical security, social media and

use of mobile technologies. The tool generates actions and suggested next steps and reports on improvements made. Evidence from the data held in the 360 degree safe Cymru tool indicates clearly that schools using the tool over a period of a few years show improved practice in these areas.

All schools in Flintshire are encouraged to register for the 360 degree safe Cymru tool and complete all 28 aspects; reviewing on an annual basis.

At Golftyn CP School we have made good progress in regards to 360 degree safe tool and we are currently a Level 2.9 and have made 70% progress against the standards.

9.3 Live Streaming

Schools may consider live-streaming as a practical and appropriate approach in certain circumstances. Safeguarding must be integral to the delivery of live-streamed lessons to ensure learners are appropriately protected. At Golftyn CP School we use live-streaming / or video-conferencing and all staff will adhere to the Live-streaming and video-conferencing: safeguarding principles and practice guidance published in May 2020 below:

https://hwb.gov.wales/zones/keeping-safe-online/live-streaming-and-video-conferencing-safeguarding-principles-and-practice/ updated March 21.

9.4 Sharing nudes and semi-nudes

Sharing nudes and semi-nudes is defined as the ‘creating and/or sharing of nude or semi-nude images, videos or live streams by young people under the age of 18’. This could be via social media, gaming platforms, chat apps or forums.

Most cases of creating and sharing nudes or semi-nude images take place outside of school, but this is where incidents often manifest. These behaviours can expose young people to risks including non-consensual sharing of images, embarrassment, bullying and increased vulnerability to blackmail and coercion or sexual exploitation. Creating and sharing sexual images of under-18s is illegal. A swift and confident response is important to ensure that children and young people are safeguarded, supported and educated.

 

Sharing nudes and semi-nudes: how to respond to an incident. An overview for all staff working in education settings in Wales

 

Please refer to the brief overview below for all staff on how to respond to incidents where nudes and semi-nudes have been shared.

All such incidents should be reported to the designated safeguarding person (DSP)

or equivalent.

  • Never view, copy, print, share, store or save the imagery yourself, or ask a child to share or download – this is illegal.
  • If you have already viewed the imagery by accident (e.g. if a young person has showed it to you before you could ask them not to), report this to the DSP (or equivalent).
  • Do not delete the imagery or ask the young person to delete it.
  • Do not ask the child/children or young person/people who are involved in the incident

to disclose information regarding the imagery. This is the responsibility of the DSP

(or equivalent).

  • Do not share information about the incident with other members of staff, the young

person/people it involves or their, or other, parents/carers.

  • Do not say or do anything to blame or shame any young person/people involved.
  • Do explain to them that you need to report it and reassure them that they will receive support and help from the DSP (or equivalent).

Please refer to the Welsh Government: ‘Sharing nudes and semi-nudes: Responding to incidents and safeguarding children and young people guidance for education settings’ for further information:

https://hwb.gov.wales/zones/keeping-safe-online/sharing-nudes-and-semi-nudes-responding-to-incidents-and-safeguarding-children-and-young-people

  • Online Abuse

 

Online abuse is any type of abuse that is facilitated through technology like computers, tablets, mobile phones, consoles and other electronic devices. Online abuse takes a number of forms and includes; cyberbullying, sexting and sexual harassment, online pornography, sexual abuse online and online radicalisation.

‘Grooming’ describes the communicative process that abusive adults use to trick a child or young person into believing they are trustworthy so that they can abuse them on and offline.

Children can be groomed online for child sexual abuse; for Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE), which is a form of child sexual abuse, for Child Criminal Exploitation (CCE) and for radicalisation. Technology can give perpetrators of abuse easier access to children than they would have in offline environments.

Any concerns that a child may be experiencing any level online abuse should be reported to the DSP immediately and action taken in accordance with the Wales Safeguarding Procedures. If you believe a child is in immediate risk of harm, for example information that they intend to or have gone to meet a possible perpetrator you should contact the police.

It is important that you do not ask anyone to forward any images or videos to you and that you do not forward any images or videos via technology yourself – even to the police.

If you suspect that there might be images/chat logs/website history on any device belonging to the child then do not delete anything on the device. The device needs to be seized and retained in the state that it’s found. Establish any PIN/device access details where possible so the device can be examined by the police in any investigation.

Please refer to the ALL WALES PRACTICE GUIDE: ‘Safeguarding children from online abuse’ for further information https://safeguarding.wales/chi/c6/c6.p6.html

  • Web Filtering

The Governing body at Golftyn CP School will ensure appropriate filters and monitoring systems are in place in line with the Recommended web filtering standards for schools in Wales guidance 2018 to ensure the school provides a safe, responsible and supportive environment to learn in, and prevent access to inappropriate or harmful content.

Please refer to the Welsh Government Guidance: 228/2018 Recommended web filtering standards for schools in Wales for further information:

https://gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2018-03/recommended-web-filtering-standards-for-schools-in-wales.pdf

10.1 The Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015 places a duty on a range of specified authorities (including proprietors of maintained schools, funded non-maintained special schools, maintained nursery schools, independent  schools, pupil referral units, colleges, work-based learning providers and universities) to have ‘due regard, in the exercise of their functions, to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism’. This is known as the Prevent Duty.

Golftyn CP School will ensure that the Prevent Duty is implemented, taking into account the local ‘Prevent’ policies, protocols and procedures. Prevent should be viewed as a safeguarding measure, and the steps our school will take are the same as the steps taken in safeguarding children and young people from other harms.

Our school will create a safe environment in which children can understand and discuss sensitive topics, including terrorism and extremist ideas, and learn how to challenge these ideas. Opportunities within the curriculum should be used to explore and challenge these topics and to promote the values of democracy, mutual respect, and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs.

It is essential that staff are able to identify pupils who may be vulnerable to radicalisation, and know what to do when they are identified. All staff members and governors are required to complete the Home Office Workshop to Raise Awareness of Prevent (WRAP) programme once every 3 years. This may be accessed as an e learning module on the link below or delivered via North Wales Police: https://www.elearning.prevent.homeoffice.gov.uk/edu/screen2.html

In safeguarding pupils from extremism and radicalisation, school governors, staff and volunteers will be alert to:

  • Disclosure by learners of their exposure to extremist actions, views or materials
  • Graffiti, symbols, writing or artwork promoting extremist messages or images
  • Reports of changes in behaviour, friendship or actions and requests for assistance
  • Partner schools, local authority services and police reports of issues affecting learners in other schools or settings
  • Learners, staff, parents or visitors voicing opinions drawn from extremist ideologies and narratives
  • Use of extremist or hate terms to exclude others or incite violence
  • Intolerance of difference
  • Attempts to impose extremist views or practices on others
  • Anti-Western or anti British views.
  • Use of the internet and social media (understanding that they are used by extremists and terrorists to promote their ideology and recruit or radicalise young people).

If you have concerns about a child or adult is being radicalised please report immediately to the DSP. If you believe a child or adult is in immediate risk of harm, you should contact the police.

The DSP can also notify the Police Hotline on 0800 789 321 or contact North Wales

Police if there are concerns or for any further advice: Telephone: 01745 588814 ext 88814 Email: Prevent@nthwales.pnn.police.uk

If there are additional concerns about an individual, for example, child protection, these will need to be referred to Childrens Services First Contact.

Golftyn CP School Preventing Extremism and Radicalisation Policy can be found on our school website, golftyncp.wales

10.2 Venue Hire

Relevant for schools who hire their facilities to the public, including groups and charities

Flintshire County Council are expected to ensure that publicly-owned venues and resources do not provide a platform for extremists and are not used to disseminate extremist views. Golftyn CP School must ensure our venue is not used by those whose views would draw people into terrorism. The governing body must ensure there is a rigorous booking system are in place and staff understand what to do if they have suspicions. Please refer to Venue Hire Procedural Guidance – Appendix 2.

Our procedures are outlined in the schools Venue Hire Policy which can be found on our school website, golftyncp.wales.

 

11.1 Access Control

Golftyn CP School is a safe and secure place for children to learn and the physical safety of children when on the school site is of paramount importance. Access to the school site is strictly monitored and reviewed in line with the Local Authority guidance on the Health and Safety of school premises.

A suitable and sufficient assessment of security risks is required to enable control measures to be devised: an example Site Security Checklist along with a Model Risk Assessment covering general access, security and safeguarding hazards can be found under the health and safety section of the Hwb website. Control measures may include appropriate lighting and perimeter protection, alongside clear signage, alarm systems and CCTV.

Please refer to the School Health & Safety Policy for further information which can be found on our school website, golftyncp.wales

Managing the school perimeter and access to buildings is a significant aspect of security, as is the management of staff and visitors to the school. It is good practice for schools to aim for one entrance where reception staff can manage visitors. At this single point of entry, staff should be able to prevent access to the school to visitors without satisfactory identification and a reason for their visit.  Staff will:

  • Ensure visitors, volunteers and students only enter through the main entrance and sign in at Reception
  • Ensure all visitors are provided with a visitor badge
  • Ensure that when a visitor leaves the premises they sign out and hand back the visitors badge
  • Ensure children are only allowed home with adults with parental responsibility or confirmed permission (primary)
  • Ensure learners never be allowed to leave school alone during school hours, and only collected by a familiar adult
  • Ask security questions to anyone leaving a message for children at the school
  • Challenge the reasons of unfamiliar adults on the school premises
  • Ensure doors are closed to prevent intrusion
  • Ensure windows in empty classrooms are closed
  • Wear ID badges (good practice).

11.2 Lockdown Procedures

Lockdown procedures should be seen as a sensible and proportionate response to any external or internal incident which has the potential to pose a threat to the safety of staff and pupils in the school. Procedures should aim to minimise disruption to the learning environment whilst ensuring the safety of all learners and staff.

Golftyn CP School has developed a robust and tested lockdown procedure for both partial and full lockdown. Details of which can be found on our Shared Google Drive, Safeguarding.

Further guidance on School Lockdown is included in the Flintshire County Council School Guide to Managing On-Site and Off Site Emergencies (currently being updated) and the WECTU Protecting Schools – an integrated security approach which can be viewed on the link below:

https://schoolbeat.cymru/fileadmin/teachers/other/wectu-guide/eng/WECTU_Schools_Security_Guide.pdf

11.3 Absconding

Under Section 3 of the Health and Safety at Work Act, 1974 and in Common Law, schools and other education settings owe a duty of care towards their learners. This duty of care requires that all reasonable steps are taken to ensure that learners are safe and remain within the care of the school at all times throughout the school day and during school led activities.

Accordingly, reasonable steps must be taken, through the pupil management and staff training programme, to minimise the likelihood of one or more learners absconding. Absconding is defined as ‘leave without permission’.

 

In order to prevent a learner from absconding, the school may consider adopting the most suitable control measures for the site:

  • a secure perimeter and gates which can be locked
  • gates / doors should be secured outside of the school’s stated drop off and pick up times
  • unsecured gates should be locked during break times if there is a significant risk of any learners absconding
  • doors into school should be locked from the outside with key coded access or similar
  • there may be a need to have high bolts /closures on doors / gates to restrict unauthorised egress by younger pupils
  • early Years should have double handled egress points
  • fire doors may have high level bolts / closures on them if significant risk of absconding. This must be recorded in the fire risk assessment and there must always be someone in the room who can unlock the door whilst pupils are present.

Where a learner attempts, or is seen to be leaving the school premises without authorisation, staff must be aware that active pursuit may encourage the learner to leave the immediate vicinity of the school and may also cause the learner to panic, possibly putting them at risk e.g. by running onto a busy road.

If the learner(s) has left the immediate vicinity of the school grounds and is no longer visible then the SLT will make a decision as how to proceed which will take into account the following:

  • age of the age of the learner,
  • prevailing weather conditions,
  • nature of the incident which led to the learner absconding,
  • learner’s previous history of being involved in episodes of absconding and their

The SLT must contact the parents / carers immediately.  If there are additional risk / vulnerability factors North Wales Police should be contacted.

North Wales Police definition for a missing person is ‘Anyone whose whereabouts is unknown whatever the circumstances of disappearance. They will be considered missing until located and their wellbeing or otherwise established’.

 

Please also refer to Missing Persons in the Flintshire Critical Incidents – School Guide to Managing On-Site and Off Site Emergencies Guidance.

12.1 It is vital that schools adopt recruitment and selection procedures, and other HR management processes that help to prevent, identify and reject people who might abuse children, or are otherwise unsuited to work with them.

All teaching and support staff must be registered with the Education Workforce Council (EWC). As the independent regulatory body for the education profession in Wales, the EWC maintains a Register of Education Practitioners under seven registration categories: school teacher, school support worker, further education teacher, further education support worker, youth worker,  youth support worker and work-based learning practitioner.

As part of pre-employment checks schools, colleges and commercial supply agencies have access to the EWC Register to check that anyone who falls under the seven registration categories is registered. If a person is included on a barred list by the DBS, they are ineligible to work in any of the seven registered professions and cannot be registered with the EWC.

 

To promote Safe Recruitment and HR practices, Golftyn CP School will:

  • Ensure that all staff, volunteers and governors undertake an enhanced disclosure

as part of the recruitment vetting process. The DBS clearance provides a disclosure

of any convictions and also checks against the DBS Adults and Children Barred List.

  • Ensure that the head teacher has sight of and records on a single central record (school database), the details of all DBS certificate checks
  • Ensure that staff, volunteers and governors renew their DBS disclosure certificates on a three yearly basis, which is considered best practice.
  • Ensure that an updated DBS disclosure certificate is obtained by any individual staff member, volunteer or governor when there are reasonable grounds to do so e.g. following involvement in criminal activity or if a professional allegation is made
  • In the event of any disclosure information being obtained, either at the point of recruitment or subsequently, ensure that a risk assessment is completed and brought to the attention of Flintshire County Council
  • A written log of all daily supply staff, volunteers and contractors will be kept clearly listing where the DBS disclosure is available, or a risk assessment will be formulated in lieu of an available DBS disclosure. Staff such as educational psychologists, supply teachers, trainee teachers, nurses, sports coaches and inspectors should be DBS checked by their employer, for example the supply agency, the university, or local authority. It is sufficient for schools to seek written confirmation that all appropriate checks, have been carried out for these people (most commonly on appointment) and by whom (most commonly the relevant human resources department). Schools should then confirm the identity of these visitors.
  • The Head teacher must ensure that any residential centres have undertaken all relevant employee checks prior to any visits commencing. Please refer to the Educational Visits Policy for further information which can be found on our school website, golftyncp.wales

For all appointments made by the Governing Body at Golftyn CP School we will adhere to the Flintshire County Council Recruitment and Selection Policy 2020-2023 and Disclosure and Baring Checks Policy.

12.2 Supply

The legal responsibility for ensuring that only appropriately registered practitioners are employed in the appropriate post lies not only with the practitioner themselves but also with the employer. Where a commercial supply agency is used, it is the responsibility of both hirer, e.g. school, FE institute and the commercial supply agencies to undertake the necessary checks; assumptions should not be made that the other has done so.

Schools are free to engage qualified supply teachers from wherever they feel appropriate to meet the needs of their school. Typical employment routes are via direct employment; LA supply lists; employing a Supernumerary / floating teacher (as an individual school or collaborating with other schools); using a commercial supply agency.

If using commercial supply agencies for cover arrangements within maintained schools, the head teacher/governing body should be aware of the National Procurement Service (NPS) Supply Teachers Framework for Wales for the provision of supply teachers commissioned on behalf of local authorities.

Using commercial supply agencies on the framework will provide schools with assurance that minimum quality standards and statutory safeguarding obligations are met, there is transparency in terms of the fees payable by schools while ensuring the protection of supply teachers by all agencies admitted to the framework.

12.3 Volunteers

Flintshire County Council regards volunteering as ‘an unpaid activity where someone freely gives their time to help an organisation or an individual who they are not related to’.

Flintshire County Council and Golftyn CP School follows the procedures outlined by the Disclosure and Barring Service to ensure the safety of children and vulnerable adults. A volunteer wishing to participate in an activity that is outlined in the DBS Criteria cannot participate in the Volunteering Activity until the Council has received a cleared DBS.

The Head teacher must ensure that volunteers have due regard for this policy and have received Safeguarding Basic Awareness training.

 

 

 

 

 

 

13.1 Any allegation of abuse made by or on behalf of a child should be taken seriously and the child should be listened to and dealt with sensitively. All staff must ensure that any allegation regarding an adult who is working with learners is reported immediately to the Head teacher or the Designated Senior Person (DSP); this will include all school staff, volunteers, governors, occasional workers or contractors and those staff who are not on the school site but come into contact with children i.e. those who transport learners to/from school, school crossing patrols etc.

If the allegation is against the Head teacher, then the Chair of Governors must be informed, who in turn must immediately inform the Chief Officer. It is essential that all allegations of abuse are dealt with fairly, quickly, fairly and consistently.

If there is an immediate threat or likelihood of harm to the child or adult at risk, the DSP / Head teacher / Chair of Governors must immediately refer to police and social services. They must also notify the Local Authority Designated Safeguarding Lead in Education as soon as possible, and always within 24 hours of reporting the concern (or next working day, if out of office hours).

The Local Authority Designated Safeguarding Lead in Education should be informed of any allegation that comes to a school’s attention and will support the Head teacher and /or Chair of Governors with how to adhere to the following guidance:

Welsh Government Guidance: Circular No: 009/2014 – Safeguarding Children in Education – Handling allegations of abuse against teachers & other staff. Note this guidance is currently under review at the time this policy was developed and therefore will be subject to change.

https://gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2018-11/safeguarding-children-in-education-handling-allegations-of-abuse-against-teachers-and-other-staff.pdf

Welsh Government Guidance: Disciplinary and Dismissal Procedures for School Staff Revised guidance for Governing Bodies (2020)

https://gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2020-02/disciplinary-and-dismissal-procedures-for-school-staff_0.pdf

Schools must use the Section 5 (previously known as Part 4) referral form when reporting an allegation about a member of staff or adult to social services.

While governing bodies have a role in exercising their disciplinary functions in respect of child protection allegations against a member of staff, they do not have a role in the consideration of individual cases, which will be investigated under arrangements set out in Safeguarding children in education: handling allegations of abuse against teachers and other staff.

If the concern / allegation involves a member of staff, the school must not make their own internal decisions about whether it is a disciplinary issue or a child protection matter. Schools should be mindful that the police have statutory powers and responsibility for determining whether a criminal investigation is to be undertaken. Schools must not undertake their own internal child protection enquiries, but report their concerns to the local authority or to the police.

Please refer to Section 5 of the Wales Safeguarding procedures for ‘Safeguarding Allegations / Concerns about Practitioners and Those in Positions of Trust’ for further information:

https://safeguarding.wales/chi/index.c5.html

13.2 Whistleblowing

The school’s Whistleblowing Policy can be used for confidential reporting of any abusive, inappropriate or unprofessional behaviour towards children or young people, or any conduct that breaches criminal law or statute; compromises health and safety; breaches accepted professional codes of conduct, or otherwise falls below established standards of practice in relation to children and young people. Any employee who believes that allegations or suspicions about a member or staff or adult have not followed procedure, has a responsibility to escalate their concern directly to the Designated Lead for Safeguarding in Education.

14.1 As an employer and provider of services Golftyn CP School will not unlawfully discriminate on grounds of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage or civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation, or on the grounds of Welsh Language.

All learners, their parents and carers, volunteers, staff and school governors are valued and will be treated with dignity and respect. Golftyn CP School will not tolerate any form of discrimination, harassment or victimisation.

In order to make sensitive and well informed professional judgments about a learner’s needs and a parent’s capacity to respond to their child’s needs, it is important that school staff are sensitive to differing family patterns, and lifestyles and to child rearing patterns that vary across different racial, ethnic and cultural groups.

We will work across our school community to ensure our commitment to equality and fairness is shared and take steps to ensure that our school is accessible, welcoming and inclusive.

15.1 The North Wales Safeguarding Children Board (NWSCB) is a statutory body which co-ordinates, monitors and challenges its partner agencies in safeguarding children in North Wales. Flintshire County Council is a statutory partner of the NWSCB.

Protecting and preventing children and adults at risk from experiencing harm and promoting the wellbeing of the people of North Wales enabling them to achieve better outcomes remains central to the Board’s work.

Schools should be aware of the work of the NWSCB and are encouraged to keep updated about local safeguarding information and training opportunities by following the link below:

http://www.northwalessafeguardingboard.wales/

The NWSCB have a statutory responsibility to undertake Multi-Agency Child Practice Reviews in circumstances of a significant incident where abuse or neglect of a child is known or suspected. A Concise Child Practice Review must be held in any of the following cases where, within the area of the Board, abuse or neglect of a child is known or suspected, and the child has:

  • Died; or Sustained potentially life-threatening injury;
  • Or Sustained serious and permanent impairment of health or development
  • and the child was neither on the Child Protection Register, nor a Looked After Child on any date during the 6 months preceding;
  • The date of the event referred to above;
  • or The date on which the Local Authority or relevant partner agency identifies that a child has sustained serious and permanent impairment of health and development.

The purpose of a Review is to identify learning for future practice and involves practitioners, managers and senior officers in exploring the detail and context of agencies’ work with a child or family. The output of a Review is intended to generate professional and organisational learning and promote improvement in future interagency child protection practice.

Schools may need to be involved in the Child Practice Review process. Schools will work closely with Education and Children’s Services in such circumstances to ensure that requests for information and documentation is responded to and attendance at Learning Events as required during a review process. Similarly, schools are expected to engage with Flintshire and Wrexham’s Strategic Missing, Exploited and Trafficked (MET) meetings as required.

Wales Safeguarding Procedures 2019 https://safeguarding.wales/

All Wales Practice Guides 2019:

 

  • Safeguarding children from Child Criminal Exploitation (CCE)

www.safeguarding.wales/chi/index.c6.html

  • Safeguarding children from Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)

www.safeguarding.wales/chi/index.c6.html

 

  • Safeguarding children affected by Domestic Abuse

www.safeguarding.wales/chi/index.c6.html

 

  • Safeguarding children from Online Abuse

www.safeguarding.wales/chi/index.c6.html

  • Safeguarding children who may be Trafficked

www.safeguarding.wales/chi/index.c6.html

Welsh Government Guidance: 265/2020 Keeping Learners Safe

https://gov.wales/keeping-learners-safe

Welsh Government Guidance: 002/2020 Disciplinary and Dismissal Procedures for School Staff Revised guidance for Governing Bodies

https://gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2020-02/disciplinary-and-dismissal-procedures-for-school-staff_0.pdf

Welsh Government Guidance: Sharing nudes and semi-nudes: Responding to incidents and safeguarding children and young people guidance for education settings

https://hwb.gov.wales/zones/keeping-safe-online/sharing-nudes-and-semi-nudes-responding-to-incidents-and-safeguarding-children-and-young-people

 

Social Services and Wellbeing Act (Wales) 2014 Working Together to Safeguard People: Non-statutory guide on information sharing to safeguard children 2019 https://gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2019-07/working-together-to-safeguard-people-information-sharing-to-safeguard-children.pdf

 

Hwb Live-streaming and video-conferencing: safeguarding principles and practice guidance published in May 2020

https://hwb.gov.wales/zones/keeping-safe-online/live-streaming-and-video-conferencing-safeguarding-principles-and-practice/

Welsh Government & UK Council for Internet Safety Five key questions for governing bodies to help challenge their schools and colleges to effectively safeguard their learners

https://hwb.gov.wales/zones/keeping-safe-online/five-key-questions-for-governing-bodies-to-help-challenge-their-schools-and-colleges-to-effectively-safeguard-their-learners/

Hwb Keeping Safe Online Zone https://hwb.gov.wales/zones/keeping-safe-online/

360 Degree Safe https://360safecymru.org.uk/dashboard/

 

WECTU: PROTECTING SCHOOLS an integrated security approach

https://schoolbeat.cymru/fileadmin/teachers/other/wectu-guide/eng/WECTU_Schools_Security_Guide.pdf

The Wales Accord on the Sharing of Personal Information (WASPI) www.waspi.org/

Operation Encompass

https://www.operationencompass.org/

School Security Checklist

https://www.teachers.org.uk/help-and-advice/health-and-safety/s/school-security-checklist

Home Office: Prevent Duty Toolkit for Local Authorities and Partner Agencies 2018 (England and Wales)

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prevent-duty-toolkit-for-local-authorities-and-partner-agencies

Home Office: Criminal exploitation of children and vulnerable adults: county lines (England and Wales) Guidance

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/criminal-exploitation-of-children-and-vulnerable-adults-county-lines#history

 

North Wales Safeguarding Board

http://www.northwalessafeguardingboard.wales/

Estyn https://www.estyn.gov.wales/faq/bullying-safeguarding-issue-or-not

Estyn Supplementary guidance: inspecting safeguarding in schools and PRUs 2017 https://www.estyn.gov.wales/system/files/2020-07/Supplementary%2520guidance%2520-%2520Safeguarding%2520in%2520schools%2520and%2520PRUs-%2520Autumn%25202017.pdf

 

Flintshire County Council: Disclosure and Baring Checks Policy

 

Flintshire County Council: School Guide to Managing Emergencies 2019

Flintshire County Council: Volunteering Policy 2016-2017

Flintshire County council: Safe Recruitment and Selection Policy 2018-2021

Flintshire County Council: Corporate Safeguarding Policy 2020

 

Appendix 1: Procedure for Making a Referral into Children’s First Contact Team

Appendix 2: Venue Hire Procedural Guidance

Appendix 3: Safeguarding Core Programme training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 1:       Procedure for Making a Referral into Children’s First Contact Team

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 2:  Venue Hire Procedural Guidance

The following questions will assist staff in determining whether a booking is considered controversial:                                                    

  √ / x Notes
1.    Establish what the school will be used for and what type of event the customer / organiser is wishing to hold.    
2.    Establish whether the name given is linked to any community group or organisation.    
3.    Request a copy of the programme details and names of any speakers.    
4.    Request all contact details of the customer / organiser (address, mobile, home and business contact number).    
5.    If the customer / organiser is not a local resident, establish why they are holding an event in this area.    
6.    Ask the customer /organiser if they have used any other venues in the county. If yes, contact the previous venue(s) to establish what the event was.

Reference: Neath Port Talbot

   

If you are concerned with the answers provided, speak to your DSP / Head teacher in the first instance. Notify North Wales Police if your concerns are founded or for any further advice:

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 3:

Flintshire Safeguarding Training Programme

 

Course Target  Group Methods Provider Frequency
Level 1 Safeguarding Basic  Awareness Whole staff including all Governors Face to Face delivery

e-learning

Live delivery online

 

DSP to deliver to all staff using FCC PowerPoint / materials.

OR

Hwb Keeping Learners Safe Modules 1-3

OR

e-learning course – Alternative approved provider which reflect the Wales Safeguarding Procedures

Annual training
Level 2

Safeguarding

Managers / Senior Leaders

 (incl. lead Governor for Safeguarding and Chair of Governors)

Face to Face delivery

e-learning

Live delivery online

FCC to source training provider and coordinate training offer.

There is a charge for attendance at this course.

at least every three years
Level 3 Safeguarding  for newly appointed DSP’s New DSP’s

(incl. lead Governor for Safeguarding and Chair of Governors)

 

Face to Face delivery

e-learning

Live delivery online

FCC to source training provider and coordinate training offer.

There is a charge for attendance at this course.

at least every two years
Level 3 Refresher training for existing DSP’s Existing DSP’s

 (incl. lead Governor for Safeguarding and Chair of Governors)

 

Face to Face delivery

e-learning

Live delivery online

FCC to source training provider and coordinate training offer.

There is a charge for attendance at this course.

at least every two years
Safeguarding Training for Governors School Governor with specific responsibility for Safeguarding Face to Face delivery

Live delivery online

 

FCC to source training provider and coordinate training offer. at least every three years
Thematic Training including:

VAWDASV Prevent / Modern Slavery / County Lines / CSE

DSP/ identified staff / Governors Face to Face delivery

e-learning

Live delivery online

 

FCC to source training provider and coordinate training offer. at least every three years
Child Protection Case Conferences and Core Groups DSP / identified staff Face to Face delivery

Live delivery online

 

Provider: Children Services Safeguarding Unit
Workforce Development Team

01352 702676

This course is available termly